HIPEC Treatment for Peritoneal Cancer in North Texas

The cancer specialists and surgical oncologists at Medical City Plano offer advanced treatment for primary peritoneal cancer (cancer originating in the peritoneum — a thin layer of tissue lining the abdomen) and peritoneal carcinomatosis (cancers that have spread to the peritoneum from gastrointestinal and gynecological organs located inside the peritoneal cavity). Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is a targeted treatment administered to a specific region of the body — the abdomen — instead of throughout your entire system. This method can reduce or eliminate some of the effects produced by traditional IV chemotherapy.

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Cancers Treated With HIPEC at Medical City Plano

The most common cancers to respond to HIPEC include:

  • Appendix cancer
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Desmoplastic small round cell tumors (typically occurs in adolescents or young adults)
  • Malignant ascites
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Peritoneal mesothelioma
  • Primary peritoneal cancer
  • Pseudomyxoma cancer
  • Stomach cancer (gastric cancer)
  • Other locally advanced cancers in the abdomen, including pancreatic cancer

The HIPEC Procedure

HIPEC is an abbreviation for hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Patients diagnosed with widespread cancer of the abdomen (peritoneal carcinomatosis) may be candidates for this treatment.

Hyperthermic = heated

Intraperitoneal = inside of the abdomen

Chemotherapy = drugs used to kill cancer cells

The HIPEC procedure delivers high doses of chemotherapy directly to cancer cells. Heating the cancer cells allows the chemotherapy drugs to be absorbed better so they can kill the cancer cells. The treatment is performed at the same time as surgery and is a single chemotherapy treatment.

HIPEC is a two-step procedure. The surgeon will first remove as much of the tumor as possible. This is called cytoreductive surgery. Next, the surgeon will administer the HIPEC treatment while the patient is still in the operating room, under anesthesia.

The chemotherapy solution is heated to 107-108 degrees Fahrenheit and infused continuously into the abdominal cavity for 90 minutes. This procedure allows the chemotherapy to bathe all of the surfaces inside of the abdomen and kill the remaining microscopic cells. After about 90 minutes of the infusion, the chemo is washed out and incisions are closed.